Statement On AOA Disruption Plan By Tony Tyler

Thank you for attending today. We would like to give you a brief update on the situation regarding industrial action by the AOA.

Flight delays:
The AOA disruption initiated yesterday is continuing in the form of work-to-rule and go-slow tactics. This is causing higher than normal levels of flight delays around our network.

Yesterday we operated 157 passenger flights, of these 25 were delayed by over 15 minutes. It is not clear exactly how many of these delays were caused by the AOA`s industrial action, but it was certainly a factor. We are currently undertaking a detailed investigation into these delays.


We sincerely apologise to our passengers for any inconvenience which they have suffered as a result of the AOA`s industrial action.


The pattern seems to be similar today. We are continuing to operate a full schedule of 130 flights. So far we have seen a total of 15 flight delays. The longest delay today was for CX501, Tokyo to Hong Kong, which was delayed by 2 hours and 35 minutes.

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The AOA disruption plan

The AOA is publicly calling upon its members to comply strictly with our operations manuals. Let me explain the legal status of the situation.

While the company and the aircrew share the responsibility for safety, it is the company that holds the required Air Operator`s Certificate and is under the strict supervision of the Hong Kong Civil Aviation Department. It is the company which publishes operations manuals which are approved by the Civil Aviation Department.

The only people authorised to interpret and amend these operations manuals are designated members of the Cathay Pacific Flight Operations management team.
The AOA`s disruption plans attempt to suggest changes to operating procedures which are not in line with established custom and practice. By offering a conflicting interpretation the disruption plan threatens to create confusion on the flight deck which in itself could undermine operational integrity.

Our pilots are professionals and we rely on them to continue to exercise good judgement. For the avoidance of doubt, we sent a message to all aircrew this morning reminding them that they are required to fly in accordance with the company`s approved operations manuals and in a manner consistent with established custom and practice.

The AOA has no authority whatsoever to revise the company`s operations manuals. Any crewmember who is guided by a third party`s interpretations of the manuals, may be in breach of his legal obligations to the company.

We call upon the AOA to consider Hong Kong`s interests rather than their own short-sighted agenda and call off their industrial action.

Thank you for listening. We would now be happy to answer any of your questions.

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