Western Wall Heritage foundation launches new interactive experiences

Western Wall Heritage foundation launches new interactive experiences

The Western Wall Heritage foundation has launched three new interactive experiences showcasing the 2,000 year old history behind the wall and how the original Temple Mount looked. 

Through the use of innovative, virtual reality technology, video and guided tours, visitors are able to immerse themselves in the wall’s history and better understand the site’s continuing, global significance. 

Offering a look into the past, visitors now have the unique opportunity to be able to visit the original temple using highly advanced, virtual reality technology.

Participants wearing a virtual reality headset will be transported back in time to the Temple Mount, allowing them to experience the temple as it appeared 2,000 years ago in ancient Jerusalem.

Temple Mount has had a contentious history over the centuries, having been destroyed twice: first by the Babylonians in 1,000 BC and then by the Romans in 516 BC.

ADVERTISEMENT

The Dome of Rock, sacred to Muslims around the world, was then built on the very ground where Temple Mount used to sit.

Visitors to the Western Wall can now immerse themselves in a 50 minute, interactive multi-media journey that follows the historical events leading to the destruction of Temple Mount and the construction of the Dome of Rock.

Located in a special room that was recently exposed in the Western Wall Tunnels, the ‘Jerusalem to Jerusalem’ experience uses a number of short video clips to highlight the continuing significance of the Western Wall for Jewish people.

For a behind-the-scenes look at the history of the Western Wall, visitors are able to join an English guided tour of the Core Excavation site.

During the tour, visitors will be able to see unique, archaeological findings from several historic periods of Jerusalem’s 3,000 years of existence, as well as remnants of the ancient Temple Mount.

The Western Wall was one of the four walls Herod The Great built to support the creation of the 1,555,000 square foot plaza on which Temple Mount stood.

The Western Wall is the last remnant of the temple and, as such, is one of the most sacred places in the world for Jewish people.