Transport reform network launch to improve transport

Transport reform network launch to improve transport

More than 300 business, industry and community leaders will come together today at Sydney’s Town hall to launch the Transport Reform Network (TRN), a cross-industry coalition aiming to address Australia’s looming transport crisis by seeking changes in the scoping, funding and pricing of transport infrastructure.

Infrastructure Australia has drawn a list of projects to tackle Australia’s infrastructure crisis and transport projects alone are estimated to cost one hundred billion dollars.
Australasian Railway Association (ARA) CEO, Bryan Nye, one of five CEO’s launching the TRN said Australians need to start insisting on reform changes or Australia’s transport services will continue to decline.
“20-30 years ago, travelling to work could be timed in minutes, now areas in Sydney, like Parramatta Road, resemble a car park and many public transport users are accustomed to standing for 30-40 minutes – things need to change, Australians should be calling for better infrastructure,” he said.
Businesses are also impacted by our deteriorating transport networks, jeopardising Australia’s international competitiveness and economy.

“Australia’s freight supply chain is one of the most expensive in the world, hampering businesses and the ability to import and export. Combine the high costs of our freight supply chain with the high Australian dollar, and it’s no surprise that businesses are increasingly moving operations and jobs overseas,” said Mr Nye.
The ARA believes that heavy users of transport infrastructure, including commercial freight companies should pay more than the average Australian for their greater use to help cover maintenance and construction costs.
“The average person shouldn’t be subsidising transport infrastructure for big business,” Mr Nye continued.
One passenger train removes 525 cars from our roads, while a freight train removes 110 trucks.
“Rail is an available solution to improve road congestion and minimise fatalities that occur on our roads every day, let’s start using it,” concluded Mr Nye.