Thousands left disappointed after London 2012 Olympics second ballot

Thousands left disappointed after London 2012 Olympics second ballot

Thousands more fans have been left disappointed after failing to secure tickets in the second round of balloting for the London 2012 Olympics.

Some 200,000 of the 1.2 million that applied have ended up empty-handed, despite being told initially they had secured tickets.

It was originally thought that people would miss out only in exceptional circumstances and the vast majority of those whose applications were accepted would get the tickets they wanted.

There were 24 sports in the second-round sale, 18 of which sold out by Friday evening. Boxing and weightlifting joined the sold-out list on Saturday. Only football, volleyball, wrestling remained for sale on Sunday.

“Over 130,000 more people will now have tickets to the Games following the first day of the second-chance sale on Friday,” said London 2012 organising committee (Locog) chairman Lord Coe. “We know there is still some disappointment from those who were not successful in their requests, but we will continue do everything we can to get them to the Games.”

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He added: “Over a million new tickets will be offered to the British public next year from contingency seats, once venues are tested and licensed, and we aim to get as many of these tickets as possible into the hands of customers who have missed out to date.”

Just 40,000 tickets for the athletics went on sale, and were all bought in the first 15 minutes. Only 600,000 of the 2.3m tickets on sale in the second phase were for sports other than football.

“Just under 90% received tickets, subject to payment,” said Locog. “Around 10% have not been successful due to the massive demand during the first two hours of sales where 10 sports sold out, some within 15 minutes.

“Emails are being sent to applicants today and whilst more applicants now have tickets to the Games, we know that there are still some disappointed customers and we will do everything we can to get them to the Games.”

“More than 1m new tickets will be offered to the British public next year from contingency seats, once venues are tested and licensed, and we aim to get as many of these tickets as possible into the hands of customers who have missed out to date.”

Locog said it had always stressed that tickets were not confirmed until applicants received their second email 48 hours later.

Lord Coe has promised that at least two-thirds of the original 1.9 million applicants will be able to buy ticket. The 700,000 who did secure tickets in the first phase will have another chance to apply for what’s left from 8 July. The remaining 1.2m tickets will go on sale from December.

Locog has also faced renewed criticism of the number that went to European applicants.

Under EU law, tickets from Locog’s application had to be made available to European purchasers.

Locog said earlier this month that 5%, or about 150,000, of the allocation had been bought by European purchasers but MPs have again criticised the process.

London.Mobi
In the build up to the 2012 Olympics, City.Mobi has launched its new guide to the capital.

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