BATA urges UK Government to adopt aviation policy

BATA urges UK Government to adopt aviation policy

The British Air Transport Association (Bata) has criticised the government for failing to develop an aviation policy.

Simon Buck, Chief Executive of the British Air Transport Association said: “Well into the Coalition‟s term of government, we are only at the first stage of having any sort of aviation policy for Britain.

“At a time when the UK is suffering arguably its worse ever economic recession and the highest levels of unemployment in seventeen years, we can ill afford continued indecision from Government on permitting private investment for the future of the public good.

“We need firm action to rebalance the economy. By refusing permission to airports to construct new infrastructure where new capacity is urgently needed, the Government is putting at risk Britain‟s ability to win business with new emerging world economies because we do not have the air services with them that we so desperately need.

“Approval of privately funded airport expansion would represent excellent value for UK plc especially where approval has already been given by the previous government following a long period of consultation where all the evidence for and against was fully considered.

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“At a time of economic crisis, it’s decisions we need, not further consultation. Successive Governments have been consulting on the future of aviation and new runway capacity for decades. Instead we need a Government able to grasp the nettle and take a bold decision if we are not to damage permanently our economic prospects.”

He concluded: “I urge the new Secretary of State to recognise that further procrastination will cost Britain dearly in terms of lost business and jobs.”

The comments coincide with the closure of the Government‟s initial “Scoping Document” consultation on a “Sustainable Policy Framework for Aviation‟.

BATA is the trade association for UK-registered airlines. Its members cover a wide range of airline services, including Monarch, British Airways and easyJet.